News

Research: Weather sensitivity: This is how bad weather affects our pain

Research: Weather sensitivity: This is how bad weather affects our pain


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Do so-called weather-sensitive people really have pain from bad weather?
Surely you have heard that especially older people suffer from pain in damp weather. Many people think that such pain is a kind of old wives' tale. However, researchers have now found that this weather-related pain appears to actually exist.

Scientists from the University of Manchester found in an investigation that bad weather can affect chronic pain in people. Affected people suffer from more severe pain in cold and damp weather. The doctors released a press release on the results of the study. The study was presented at the British Science Festival in Swansea.

Weather-related pain affects women more often
The early results of the large-scale study show that people with chronic pain experience less pain when the weather warms between February and April, the authors say. Accordingly, so-called weather-dependent pain is not an invention of predominantly older people. A recent survey also found that weather complaints tend to affect women.

Cold weather affects our health more than hot weather
The weather can have an impact on our health, explain the doctors. For example, it is known that cold weather is more critical to health than hot one. The weather also affects diseases such as migraines. Medicines had already shown that bad weather can cause people headaches.

9,000 subjects recorded their daily pain
Researchers from the University of Manchester analyzed the data of around 9,000 people with chronic pain for their investigation. The subjects suffered from health problems such as arthritis, back problems and migraines, the researchers explain. The participants logged their symptoms every day using a smartphone app.

Pain declines from February to April
If the number of summer days increases in the period from February to April, this reduces the time of severe pain, the experts say. The pain level then increased again in June. At this point the weather is usually humid but also warmer. The study was conducted on people in three different cities in the UK. These three cities were Leeds, Norwich and London, the scientists add.

Study examines the effects of weather on chronic pain for the first time
We have heard anecdotal statements for a long time that people with chronic illnesses experience more pain when the weather is bad, says project leader Professor Will Dixon from the University of Manchester. Sufferers also often said that they could predict the weather due to this increasing pain. Amazingly, there has never been a real investigation into the aggravation of weather-related pain from cold or bad weather. In the UK alone, around 28 million people suffer from some form of chronic pain, the authors add.

Joint pain does not get worse in the cold
The early results of the new study are encouraging. I think there is definitely a possible link between the weather and chronic pain, says Professor Dixon. The results of our investigations also contradicted another widely used hypothesis, the expert continued. This is about the conviction that the colder the weather, the worse the joint pain, the doctor explains. This is not the case.

Study continues and new subjects are sought
The chronic pain actually intensifies again from April to June. During this period, the temperature usually rises, the experts say. Accordingly, the common hypothesis does not seem to make sense. Professor Dixon and his colleagues are still looking for further subjects for their large-scale study. This investigation will continue to collect data on the relationship between bad weather and chronic pain until April 2017. (as)

Author and source information



Video: Rainy weather brings joint pain for some elders among us (May 2022).